Category Archive: farming

2017
09/24

Category:
farming
Life
quilts

COMMENTS:
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Daisy and “Ribbons” table runner

On the left is Daisy at 4 months  (I know -not French, but she said that is who she is) and Beau on the right when he was 2 months.   I find it interesting how long those little noses grow.    Daisy has become quite playful.   She gets so excited when I come to see her that her whole little body wiggles.  However, today, Lacey let her know that she (Daisy) is at the bottom of the totem.  She didn’t hurt her, just rolled her over.

Here is the “Ribbons” table runner for which I tested the pattern.   It is available from the Quilt Pattern Magazine in their October issue.   It measures 20 x 53 and is easily made larger or smaller.   It looks so very different in different color combinations and it would be fun to have a different holiday on the reverse side.   I love testing for this company because I can choose which ones I want to test and the colors.   Therefore I can make items that I can use.

2017
09/21

Category:
farming

COMMENTS:
4 Comments »

New faces on the farm

WE HAVE NEW FACES HERE ON THE FARM!!!This new face does not yet have a name.   Since they are from the French side of the Pyrenees mountains, I was looking for a good French name for her.  So far, nothing I’m really fond of.   It may turn out not French.  She is 4 months old and since this was the first time away from home and family, she is SCARED.

She found a corner here to hide where she can also see.
The sheep wanted to meet her, but she is leary.

Let’s try again

And 2 pygmy goat kids have taken up residence.   They were purchased by people who didn’t realize how much time it takes to care for animals.   They asked if I would take them and they came named Betty and Billy.   They are cute and they should fit in as they were born in April, so still young and flexible.

 

2017
09/19

Category:
farming
Garden

COMMENTS:
2 Comments »

Stuck sheep/garden update

This stuck sheep showed some real talent in getting her head in here.   She had to move forward while turning her head sideways.    However, getting her out took 2 of us.  One to pull her backwards and the other to twist her head.  She just kept pushing forward.  There are always lessons to be learned from these sheep.Once we helped her out, she was very happy to join her friends in a meal of grain.

The garden is giving us very large cantaloupe this year after starting out with giving us personal sided melons.   These are two people melons.   I am definitely saving seed from these.

This is the end of the cucumbers though there are still a few more zucchini and peppers in the garden.   This week, we will clean out some of the beds.

No photo as it seemed dangerous, but the honey bees are battling the wasp who would like to rob the hives.   Next year we will be putting up wasp traps.

2017
09/15

Category:
farming
food
Life

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All day dozing and winter food prep

Today was more food prep for winter and for the weekend.  So the applesauce was canned, rice cooked, greens cooked, and split pea soup made.   Laundry was washed and that’s about as domestic as I could handle today after the gym.

lt’s difficult to see in the shade, but this little fellow and his great big brother worked in the pasture all day.   The day started with someone not closing a gate, so all the Cormo

sheep decided to form one group in the pasture without a fence between them.   Fortunately there is only one mature ram here so they are just getting the chance to breed a bit earlier than had been planned.   It could have been a disaster if we had had more than one mature ram.   I will mark my calendar for 150 days from today though I don’t think any of the ladies were ready.  There is always some type of excitement and that doesn’t even include having a dog that got out and was checking out the neighborhood.

Sunday, the plan is to seed the pasture that is ready and possibly finish dozing and seed the rest of the pasture next week.   These things always take longer than expected and don’t seem to go exactly as planned,

Shabbat Shalom  Enjoy they day.

2017
09/14

Category:
farming
Life

COMMENTS:
1 Comment »

Dozing begins

It is so dry after 2 months of no rain, that if it has even a hint of green one knows from a long distance that it is nettles growing.  So the dozing begins.   They have taken down all the blackberries in the top pasture and tomorrow will finish removing the  nettles in this pasture.  Then they will plant what they estimate to be about 3 acres.  The weather forecast  is for rain and in the 60s all but one day next week.   Absolutely perfect weather for pasture growing.   I am getting excited about this as I’ve waited a long time to get this done.  The sheep will be excited in the spring.

There is so much farm cleaning and repairing right now to get ready for winter.  I’m hoping to get back to the sewing machine next week, when the weather isn’t encouraging me to be outside.  I think my sewing studio is missing me.

 

2017
09/12

Category:
farming
Life

COMMENTS:
2 Comments »

Nothing done

Some days it seems as if I worked all day and got nothing done.   Since that has been a persistent feeling this month, today, I decided to write down what I did.

  1. Cleaned and stemmed the grapes, laid them on trays and put in freezer,  (I’ll thaw them out and dehydrate when the cucumbers are done -to make raisins)

  2. Loaded the dehydrator with cucumbers chips.

  3. Cleaned and cooked collard greens

  4. Took food scraps out to sheep

  5. Went to the grocery store

  6. Fed the bees

  7. Picked an apron full of apples, cut and cored them to cook (too many earwigs in them so lots of discard)

  8. Took scraps to sheep

  9. Went to upper barn, fed sheep, put soap in the barrel with soaking fleece and filled with water.

  10. Mopped kitchen floor

  11. Made lunch (finished lunch at 2 PM)

  12. Sat down to watch some “Back to basics summit” homestead videos

  13. Fed dogs and sheep in both locations

  14. made supper

  15. cooked apples

  16. made just over 3 quarts of applesauce

  17. husked popcorn   – Isn’t it pretty

That looks better, I really did do something and feel justified being tired.   Off for a nice relaxing bath and then put the feet up and watch another sewing video.  Maybe tomorrow, after gym, and a few basic chores,  the rest of the sheep will get wormed and we will start deciding which rams to put with which ewes.   They are definitely getting interested.

2017
09/06

Category:
Bees
farming
food
Life
quilts
Shopping

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Ankle brace and long ago

I spent two afternoons getting this ankle brace fit.   I somehow injured the tendon that goes by the ankle and so for at least the next 6 weeks, I will be wearing this.   It does slow me down some.   But hopefully it will give the tendon time to heal.

This afternoon, I was looking for felt that I think I have to finish the twinkling snowmen wall hanging when I found a box that was put away long ago and I wasn’t even missing.   In it were some unfinished projects. Imagine that!  One was labeled as a quilt that a daughter was going to make.   However, she only chose fabrics and didn’t actually start.   So that was easy, I just put the fabrics back with the other fabrics.   Project done.   Then there was this Fall pattern with pattern pieces pinned to it and not put back together very carefully.   So I will try to figure out what was going on here and possibly finish it.   The pattern is dated 2001, so I know that it is not older than that and might be 2-3 years younger.

I did make a trip to the grocery as it has been so very dry that we are having to supplement this for nectar from flowers so the bees don’t starve this winter.  Then I went to the bee supply store.  The item on the left is a “J” hook to use when looking inside the hive and the thing on the right is a “bee protein patty” which I’m guessing has peanut butter in it.  The screen is for making the entry hole smaller to keep the yellow jackets from storming into the hive and stealing.

We froze a few more bananas for “nice cream” which we enjoy on hot days.

And, because you asked, this is what the cucumber chips look like when they are ready to eat.

 

2017
09/03

Category:
farming
food
Garden
Life
quilts

COMMENTS:
3 Comments »

September’s OMG plus other goals

 

ELM STREET OMG

 

This project has been in the making for 3 months and this is as far as it has come.   So this will be my primary focus.   I’ve stalled because this will take thinking and doing some unfamiliar things.   All those spots in the photo on the left are little twinkling lights. Perhaps linking up to Elm Streets One Monthly Goal will give me the push I need.

OTHER GOALS:  September’s sewing/quilting goals will be more modest as we have much work to get the sheep and pastures set up for breeding.   We also will be finishing up the gardens in the next two months.  Grapes are set to start picking in another week and tomatoes, cucumbers, and other items need to be harvested and put up.   Then there are the new greens for winter which are just peeking out of the ground.   Hopefully, we will get the water and propane lines finished that we started.   Then we are still waiting for the big dozer to come in and clear more land that will be put into pasture.   So the next two months will be extremely busy.

2.  I haven’t chosen a project yet, but there will be one for Hatched in Africa

3.  If there is time, I’d like to get another of the Sunbonnet Sue quilts quilted and bound.

TODAY:   I occupied my time picking up some bananas at the grocery and two 30 mile round trips to pick up the grain that I had ordered.   It comes in 40# bags and I was on my own today.   So I was pleased to find that I could handle the 26 bags and get them where they needed to be.

I am also doing a fair amount to studying to find exactly what these sheep need to produce the best wool.   It seems there is some controversy on this, so I’m doing some research.

2017
09/01

Category:
farming
food
Life

COMMENTS:
1 Comment »

Kitchen work, fiber play

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitchen work this morning included finishing the pear butter which has now been finished and processed, ready for the winter.   Then I sliced these cucumbers to dehydrate for chips.   They are so good with hummus, which is made with one can of white beans and one can of garbanzos.   I process this until smooth by adding a bit of water and then soy sauce and lemon juice to taste.   Oh, soooo good.

Then it was time fiber play time.   My neighbor and I changed coats on some of the lambs (can’t take a photo while holding sheep) and then we were joined by these lovely people from the Brooklyn Tweed company.   They came to touch and examine the Cormo sheep that live here.  They wanted to see how they are raised and how lusciously soft their wool is as they are considering a line of Cormo wools for their company.   We spent a delightful afternoon with them and then it was time to feed and water the sheep for the evening.  It was such a lovely way to begin September.

And now:   Shabbat Shalom and have a safe and wonderful holiday.

Whirlwind August

What a whirlwind this month of August has been.   I feel as if I have been chasing my tail.  Today is the end of the month and I did finish 4 sewing/knitting goals, but two were left undone.  A third,

is now put together with backing and batting, but when I have time, I’d like to add more quilting.

In addition to these projects, I have spent an incredible amount of time in the kitchen.  Today again, there was more pear butter canned as well as more produce brought in.   I have another dehydrator full of cucumbers for chips, the last batch of pear butter is condensing in the crock pot, the refrigerator is full of cucumbers waiting their turn.   I gave up and gave some raspberries, blueberries, cucumbers, zucchini, and tomatoes to the neighbor.   The grapes are starting to get ripe and the weather is so incredible, this scenario may continue for another month.   We have started new beets and greens for the winter and they have popped their little heads above ground now.    And we water, water, water, water.  Usually it rains a day or two when school starts, but not this year.

Today a neighbor came over and we wormed 1/3 of the sheep for the winter.   We will be dividing them and giving each group a suitor soon.   Then we count out 5 months to start the baby business.

In between all this, we have made time for doctors visits and a very few staples to eat.  (Today, I visited with the Geek squad so I could bring you this report – I love those fellows) And we have daily fed, watered, and cared for the bees, sheep, ducks, geese, and dogs – oh, yes, and for each other.   I am loving this crazy, out of control summer.